Black Theatre Live

Ambreen Razia

As a 22 year old British Pakistani writer/actress It was my mission to create and explore stories which stem from contemporary characters from our generation, particularly those who have been brought up in London, focusing on characters which obtain a different cultural identity along with conflicting traditional values.  After having worked with a number of young women between the ages of 12-16, some of who have been ex gang members, single mothers or exposed to other issues such as FGM, domestic violence, child sex exploitation, my mission was to explore how the young people of our generation deal with the different types of pressures which London has to offer whilst trying to assimilate their foreign identity with their British identity, asking the question is this genuinely possible to achieve? 

The idealisms which some young people are forced to adopt due to a lack of communication and guidance from the Adults/Respected Figures and role models  of our society, what damage and confusion can be caused in young people when there is too much expectation and not enough of a clear communication between the generational divide. After having spoken to a number of young people I became very aware as to what the overall effect is when something like love, tactility and a genuine human connection is seen as redundant by the generation above.

After finding the need to give our generation a voice through a per formative  aspect, I went on to write my debut play ‘The Diary of a Hounslow Girl’ which was commissioned by Ovalhouse Theatre in June earlier this year. The show itself ended up selling out on three of the four nights it was on, one of the nights being predominantly young women between the ages of 12-16.

After having released the trailer for the show on twitter, I was invited on to BBC Asian radio network to talk to radio show host Nihal about the content of the play, primarily focusing on the big question What is a ‘Hounslow Girl’? and the issues which are unravelled and tackled, other radio interviews included Reprezent FM

During one of the evenings we led a panel/ Q & A discussion about the play itself and the issues that BAME artists often face in the arts. The panel included: Rez Kabir (Founder and Artistic Director of Tamarind Theatre Company), Suman Bhuchar (Marketing Director of East is East at the Trafalgar studio’s), Aisha Zia (Writer of No Heart, No Guts, No Glory in conjunction with Commonwealth Theatre & Natalie Smith (Educational Director of Arc Theatre).

Ambreen's acting credits include: On the Middle day (The Old Vic Theatre); Words and Women (Edinburgh Fringe); Variation’s on a theme (Camden People's Theatre); Mind the Gap (The Royal National Theatre) Random Acts (Channel 4); No Guts, No Heart, No Glory (BBC 4 / International Tour)

Ambreen is currently filming for a new drama with BBC Three which will be aired in February next year and is currently in pre-production with her latest project 'The Disturbance Season' trilogy,  capturing the lost voices of our generation through three short films which she has written and co-written for. Ambreen is also working on her next play ‘POT’ inspired by her work as a facilitator, primarily focusing on the recent comeback of ‘gang culture’ within UK. Ambreen’s self-written and debut one woman show ‘The Diary of Hounslow Girl’ finished it’s run at Ovalhouse Theatre in June 2015.


SHOWS

The Diary of a Hounslow Girl

The Diary of a Hounslow Girl

4 May 2016

Ambreen Razia

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